Senior Driver Regulations by State

Senior drivers are generally considered safer drivers because they usually follow the rules, such as wearing a seatbelt and driving below the speed limit. However, they also often have diminishing vision, hearing and reaction time. AAA writes that “Although Americans are healthier and living longer than ever before, seniors are outliving their ability to drive safely by an average of 7 to 10 years. Most older drivers recognize and avoid situations where their limitations put them at risk. They drive less after dark, during rush hour or in bad weather, and avoid difficult roads such as highways and intersections.”

It’s the older driver’s who don’t recognize and avoid situations where their limitations put them at risk that give older drivers a bad reputation. Each year it seems an older person who probably shouldn’t be driving strikes and kills a pedestrian or driver and the situation makes headlines across the country. Often when such an incident occurs, state legislation will soon pass that addresses older drivers and the driving license. What’s impressive about this is the large variance in how states have chosen to address this issue. Many states don’t address the issue at all, while others require in-person renewals, vision tests, doctor’s approval and even written tests.

Wondering what your state does? Check out this list below of license renewal policies. One thing that is very clear: very few states agree on the best policy.

License renewal times frames and any special requirements per Claimsjournal.com

  • Alabama – Renew every 4 years regardless of age.
  • Alaska – Renew every 5 years. Age 69 and older must visit DMV for renewal (renewal by mail no longer an option).
  • Arizona – Licenses expire on the 65th birthday. Age 65 and older renew every five years, with a vision test. Age 70 and older can no longer renew by mail.
  • Arkansas – Renew every 4 years regardless of age.
  • California – Renew every 5 years. Age 70 and older must renew in person and must take both a written exam and an eye exam.
  • Colorado – Renew every 10 years until age 61, then renew every 5. Age 66 and over must provide certification of eye exam if renewing by mail.
  • Connecticut: Renew every 6 years, regardless of age.
  • Delaware: Renew every 8 years, regardless of age.
  • District of Columbia: Renew every 8 years. Age 70 and older must renew in person and provide a doctor’s certificate stating they are fit to drive.
  • Florida: Renew every 8 years until age 80, then renew every 6 years. Age 80 and over must pass an eye exam.
  • Georgia: Renew every 8 years until age 59, then renew every 5 years. Age 64 and older must also pass an eye exam.
  • Hawaii: Renew every 8 years until age 72, then renew every 2 years.
  • Idaho: Renew every 8 years until age 64, then renew every 4 years.
  • Illinois: Renew every 4 years. Age 75 and older must take a road test and vision test. Age 87 and older renew annually.
  • Indiana: Renew every 6 years until age 75, then every 3 years.
  • Iowa: Renew every 5 years until age 70, then every 2 years.
  • Kansas: Renew every 6 years until age 65, then every 4 years with an eye exam.
  • Kentucky: Renew every 4 years regardless of age.
  • Louisiana: Renew every 4 years. Age 70 and older must renew in person.
  • Maine: Renew every 6 years until age 65, then every 4 years. At age 40 an eye exam is required every other renewal until age 62, then an eye exam is required at every renewal.
  • Massachusetts: Renew every 5 years. Age 75 and older must renew in person and have an eye exam.
  • Michigan: Renew every 4 years.
  • Minnesota: Renew every 4 years.
  • Mississippi: Renew every 8 years.
  • Missouri: Renew every 6 years, until age 70, then every 3 years.
  • Montana: Renew every 8 years until age 75, then every 4 years.
  • Nebraska: Renew every 5 years. Age 72 and older must renew in person.
  • Nevada: Renew every 4 years. Age 71 and older must renew in person or provide doctor’s certification to renew by mail.
  • New Hampshire: Renew every 5 years, regardless of age.
  • New Jersey: Renew every 4 years, regardless of age
  • New Mexico: Renew every 8 years until age 67, then every 4 years. Age 75 and older renew annually. Driver’s of all ages must take a vision test with each renewal.
  • New York: Renew every 8 years, regardless of age.
  • North Carolina: Renew every 8 years until age 66, then every 5 years.
  • North Dakota: Renew every 6 years until age 78, then every 4 years.
  • Ohio: Renew every 4 years regardless of age.
  • Oklahoma: Renew every 4 years, regardless of age.
  • Oregon: Renew every 8 years. Age 50 and older must take a vision test with each renewal.
  • Pennsylvania: Renew every 4 years regardless of age.
  • Rhode Island: Renew every 5 years until age 75, then renew every 2 years.
  • South Carolina: Renew every 10 years until age 65, then every 5 years. Vision test required for age 65 and older.
  • South Dakota: Renew every 5 years regardless of age.
  • Tennessee: Renew every 5 years regardless of age.
  • Texas: Renew every 6 years until age 85, then every 2 years. Age 79 and older must renew in person.
  • Utah: Renew every 5 years regardless of age.
  • Vermont: Renew every 4 years regardless of age.
  • Virginia: Renew every 8 years. Age 80 and older must renew in person and pass eye exam.
  • Washington: Renew every 5 years. Age 65 and older must renew in person. All persons, regardless of age, are required to do an in-person renewal every other renewal.
  • West Virginia: Renew every 5 years regardless of age.
  • Wisconsin: Renew every 8 years regardless of age.
  • Wyoming: Renew every 4 years regardless of age.
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